1. Recent Articles

    1. Security, Privacy Musts for Connected Cars Revolution

      Security, Privacy Musts for Connected Cars Revolution

      Connected cars present a chance to “revolutionize mobility” but they also stand out as “prominent targets” for hackers, Federal Trade Commissioner Terrell McSweeny said Feb. 4. If there is no consumer trust in connected cars' ability to secure personal information, consumers won't buy them, McSweeny said at the Connected Cars USA 2016 conference. There is a real opportunity to increase security and, along with it, consumer trust, she said.

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      Mentions: Toyota
    2. Report examines the massive future cybersecurity problem of connected cars

      Report examines the massive future cybersecurity problem of connected cars

      If you are interested in the Internet of insecure Things, then you might like a new report which looks at the cybersecurity of connected vehicles, calling it "one of the biggest issues facing manufacturers today. " Cyber Security in the Connected Vehicle attributed that threat to complexity, connectivity, and content. There's a "massive future security problem just around the corner," and it can't be fixed by trying to bolt on security during the implementation phase.

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    3. The Army Goes All-In with Self-Driving Vehicles

      Self-driving vehicles are thought to be the wave of the future. There is already autonomous technology in our cars from lane keep assist to automatic emergency braking with the promise of fully autonomous vehicles looming on the horizon. Everyone thinks about the tech in terms of personal cars and ride-sharing services, but the US Army is looking at it for their fleets.

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    4. Under the skin of the Toyota Mirai - drinking to the future

      Under the skin of the Toyota Mirai - drinking to the future

      For a car like no other in production, the hydrogen fuel cell-powered Toyota Mirai – theoretically on sale for £60,000 but in reality impossibly limited by supply – feels reassuringly easy to drive. Once you’ve settled behind the wheel, you find the Mirai’s responses are strongly reminiscent of those of a Nissan Leaf,

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    5. Recalls and the Connected Car: Is In-Vehicle Technology the Answer?

      Recalls and the Connected Car: Is In-Vehicle Technology the Answer?

      Today’s cars come with very sophisticated technology, including live navigation with traffic and obstacle reports, collision avoidance systems, cell phone integration and wireless connectivity. Automakers are now investigating how they can leverage this technology to communicate any vehicle issues to vehicle owners. The OnStar system already reports vehicle concerns. These are collected from the vehicle itself and relayed via e-mail to both the owner and the dealership.

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      Mentions: OnStar Tesla
    6. Osram takes aim at mass market with BMW laser headlights

      Osram takes aim at mass market with BMW laser headlights

      Germany's Osram is equipping BMW 7 series limousines with laser headlight modules, marking a move to the mass market for the technology.

      Osram pioneered the use of laser modules in car headlights - which are smaller, brighter and more energy-efficient than LED (light-emitting diode) headlamps - and is the only company so far to offer a complete laser module for automakers.

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      Mentions: Audi BMW
    7. Formula One Racing Can Drive CFD Innovation Faster

      Formula One Racing Can Drive CFD Innovation Faster

      Formula One racing teams have the need for speed, and even more importantly, acceleration. It is what wins races, after all. But the funny thing about the Formula One sport is that the speed of the parallel clusters that run the software that is used to design racing cars is capped. And that means wringing performance out of those systems is absolutely vital if a team hopes to not be lapped by its rivals.

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    8. Connectivity needs to suit the user in question

      Connectivity needs to suit the user in question

      The connected car brings a host of benefits for end-users, suppliers, OEMs and commercial fleet managers alike, but building a positive business case for embedding connectivity across the vehicle range is not quite as clear-cut as it may seem. In-vehicle infotainment acts as a selling point for many new car buyers, with the vehicle manufacturers and supporting suppliers benefitting from such demand.

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